A Little Time and a Keyboard: Soaking in Nature's Emerald Hues at Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve

Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Soaking in Nature's Emerald Hues at Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve


Soaking in Nature's Emerald Hues at Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve

Soaking in Nature's Emerald Hues at Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve in St. Charles, IL

When we embarked on our visit to Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve, I was at first a bit hesitant because we would be exploring less than 2 miles of trails. However, our hike quickly immersed us into complete forest bathing in a sea of green. Tekakwitha Woods captivated us.


Surrounded by the emeralds of the forest at Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve.
Surrounded by the emeralds of the forest at Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve.
Part of Tekakwitha Woods' trail parallels the Fox River Trail for a stretch. Additionally, Tekakwitha Woods is across the Fox River from Jon J. Duerr Forest Preserve. Both provide additional nature experiences nearby to add to your adventure. Trails at Tekakwitha are a mix between paved and natural.

Trails are both paved and natural at Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve.
Trails are both paved and natural.
Walking through the preserve we marveled at nature all around. We did not spot anyone else along the trail and benefited from the lack in activity on the trails allowing us to see and hear more wildlife.

A bridge crosses a stunning ravine at Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve
A bridge crosses a stunning ravine.
Peering into a picturesque ravine:

A bridge crosses a ravine furnishing an opportunity for a fantastic view. We were enchanted by nature in her glory as we peered from the bridge.


We were not expecting the ravine and truly enjoyed the landscape. After passing the bridge, we descended down towards the Fox River.

Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve runs along the Fox River.
The forest runs along the Fox River.
For awhile, the trail ran along the Fox River. We spied wonderful views framed by nature.


 A forest with history:

Tekakwitha is an older forest. Wanderers will discover lofty tree crowns and plenty of decomposing treasures. Reflecting on the history of the preserve, Tekakwitha is named for Mohawk Kateri Tekakwitha. Kateri Tekakwitha was beatified by Pope John Paul II in 1980 and canonized by Pope Benedict XVI in 2012. The land was once owned by the Sisters of Mercy. Upon sale to the forest preserves, the order requested the preserve be named for Saint Kateri. Saint Kateri is the first Native American saint and is a patron of the environment and ecology. Truly a fitting namesake for the preserve!



As we wound through the footpaths of the forest, we knew we would be back. Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve natural charm delighted us throughout our journey.


The bridge at Tekakwitha opening up to the forest all around.
The bridge at Tekakwitha opening up to the forest all around.
We escaped the worries of everyday enveloped in the natural beauty of the Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve. I look forward to future visits including the fall to see the forest ablaze in fall colors!

Soaking in Nature's Emerald Hues at Tekakwitha Woods Forest Preserve



2 comments:

  1. i grew up here. the tekakwitha Indians were in a war with the other side of the river. the black hawks. the bike path along side was the original rt 25. even though it wasnt named that yet. the bridges on the bike path were made from 1910-1912. during this time al capone made his hideout about 100 ft to left of the preserve on the fox river. there also used to be several tux and fedora shops in the neighborhood.

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  2. Thanks for the additional info! I no idea about the Al Capone hideout! Now, I remember there are graves from the Black Hawk War in Jon J. Duerr Forest Preserve. According to the Kane County Forest Preserves, they named this preserve after St.Kateri Tekakwitha. Stunning area with such a history!

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